$500 million Facebook investment makes it more valuable than eBay

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Goldman and Digital Sky Technologies have invested $500 million in Facebook, which values the company at $50 billion, and this in a company which has yet to offer shares on the stock markets.

The investment probably doubles Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder’s personal wealth to some $6 or $7 billion. It also values Facebook above the likes of eBay, Time Warner and Yahoo! Facebook has also according to Hitwise reports overtaken Google as the most visited site on the Internet.

Many companies are still figuring out how to make money out of Facebook, one thing is for sure though if you haven’t already it’s time to get your business on Facebook and start interacting with your customers… because that’s where they’re all hanging out.

11 Responses

  1. Maybe because I am an old fart, maybe it is just what I buy and sell but I’m just not convinced by Facebook. Certainly, I am not influenced to buy anything from what I’ve found there.

    Internet influence wise, way out in front is Amazon Reviews, then posts on topic specific forums. If you are selling in a niche, that’s the way to go. Or you can try putting an enormous amt of effort into rising above all the noise on Facebook. It might work.

  2. Frooition design Facebook stores to match your eBay shop. Why have a Facebook store when you can direct Facebook traffic to you own website?

  3. I signed up for a facebook store as soon as it was available. Not a sausage. Facebook is not a place where people go to trade, although if you have enough exposure ie so called friends you will undoubtedly benefit.
    There are no doubt certain businesses where Facebook is of immense benefit – thinking here of pop music, minor celebrity type stuff, talking shop type stuff where there is some kind of spin off sale but it doesn’t follow that there is business to be had just by spending hours on facebook. You could well do a lot better by spending those hours on your website or existing shopping sites.

  4. How much is Myspace worth these days?! LOL I can’t be bothered putting my time into a 5 minute fashion fad

  5. Goldman Sachs creating another bubble, very profitable business selling things of no value for loads of money. No risk either, when the **** hits the fan go and get a great big bailout from the governments, (that is plural, UK, US and most every one plugged in to the current banking fraud system). Bankers won’t forget to collect their multimillion bonuses whatever happens, paid for by the poor people (taxpayers – rich people don’t pay tax).

    This Web 2.0 bubble is just a little bubble until the next big one in about a decade. More CO2 is really good for the environment (plants grow bigger and faster, deserts shrink etc) so all those carbon credits will be worthless and those who have invested in them (pensions, trusts, insurers, oil companies etc) will need bailouts.

  6. I always wonder just what is the “Real” value of the various Companies involved in Computers, IT, Internet etc. I am not certain if you can remember back to the “Dot Com Bubble” when Companies that had never traded. That showed as their only assets a couple of PC’s and operated from somebodies spare bedroom were being valued at £5 or more million pounds. When I was an Accountant I on a couple of occassions was involved in valuing businesses that my employers were looking at with the idea of taking them over. It was easy. There was the premises, the stock, the “goodwill” and of course several years of Accounts showing such as Turnover, Profit and Loss. These were items that could be valued with some degree of accuracy. But these days the values quoted are often enormous. But just how justified are they in the long term. In fact do they have any basis in reality. Please don’t ask me because I have not got the foggiest but I suspect that nobody else does either. However over the years there have been many examples of Companies that have spent a great deal of time and effort often with very highly qualified advisers who have bought a business only to find that what they have bought is really not worth a hill of beans. I wonder if this could apply to the values of some of these businesses today certainly I would not be raiding my piggy-bank to buy any of them(my piggy bank will not stretch that far before anybody asks).

  7. Goldman Sachs again.

    Weren’t they part of the lot that created the biggest bubble in history the sub prime market ?

    Also do you notice that Facebook no longer announce how many members they have. It was 300 million, 400 million now its stuck on 500 million.

    But I have advertised on Facebook and made sales, its just that the ads end up costing too much.

  8. Goldman Sachs again. Weren’t they part of the lot that created the biggest bubble in history the sub prime market ? Also do you notice that Facebook no longer announce how many members they have. It was 300 million, 400 million now its stuck on 500 million. But I have advertised on Facebook and made sales, its just that the ads end up costing too much.

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